School me: a hoist at home

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Harv
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School me: a hoist at home

Post by Harv »

Operating out of a single-car fibro garage is finally getting the better of me. The walls need reskinning, the open eaves drive me to despair (dust on everything), the roller door doesn't seal at the bottom (because the whole thing has a lean (that I couldn't correct with a comealong and 8mm chain :shock:... that lean is permanent) and the attached carport needs reroofing. I'm thinking of demolishing it, and getting something bespoke built. It's only a quarter acre block, so no mega-shed. To be blunt, if I ended up with too big a shed I'd only fill it with crap. Not interested in mancave space, no need for ablutions. This will not be a simple project... when I checked a few years back my local council typically takes 18 months to approve a development application :shock:

I'm figuring that long term I will end up with 3 cars - a daily (the wagon for now), a project (the FB for now) and the FED. The daily gets the carport, so two cars need to go into the shed. If I end up with more cars, the driveway is long enough to store a few for a while. I need some workbench space and some storage, but not a huge amount. Hoping not to go to a double-width garage if I can avoid it, as that would leave almost no backyard. I'm figuring on something with a floorplan maybe 1.5 times wider than a single car garage.

So if I can't go sideways, I need to go up. I'm thinking of a hoist, both to work on cars but also to store one up out of the way. Maybe a baby mezzanine if there is leftover space. Some questions please from those who own their own hoist at home:
a) two or four post, given it will be a storage rack as well as a work tool?
b) can I get away with 240V, or am I going to have to pony up for 3-phase?
c) any recommendations on manufacturer?

Hoping not to get hoisted on my own petard.

Cheers,
Harv
327 Chev EK wagon, original EK ute for Number 1 Daughter, an FB sedan meth monster project and a grey motored FED.
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Errol62
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Re: School me: a hoist at home

Post by Errol62 »

I'm considering same and all the advice is for 4 post, whether storing or working on. 4 post has the car sitting as on the road. You do need jacking pads in addition, adding to the price. For storage 2 post is relatively dangerous in my opinion.

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Harv
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Re: School me: a hoist at home

Post by Harv »

Errol62 wrote: Mon Nov 07, 2022 3:14 pmYou do need jacking pads in addition, adding to the price.
... and drip trays, because any car I put on the hoist will try to cover the car underneath in "rust inhibitor" :lol:

Cheers,
Harv
327 Chev EK wagon, original EK ute for Number 1 Daughter, an FB sedan meth monster project and a grey motored FED.
56FJ
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Re: School me: a hoist at home

Post by 56FJ »

Hello Harv. I’ve just had a 240 volt 2 post hoist from Tufflift installed. I went with a two post because I wanted the ability to easily check wheel bearings, king pin slack and also to spin wheels when adjusting the brakes. It is the clear floor model as I didn’t want to be stepping over a baseplate all the time. I agree that a 2 post might not be ideal to store a vehicle. I would be concerned with all the weight being on the cross member for a prolonged period of time. I was advised that a 240 volt will certainly do the job albeit slightly slower to raise the car than the 3 phase. The upside is that it would be much easier to sell if ever the need arose. A 2 post requires a 150 mm concrete floor although this thickness is only needed in the centre of the slab where the posts are anchored. As I was having a new slab poured I went with this cheaper option. Positioning the pads under the front of the FE is a little tricky as mudflaps and handbrake cable are in the way but I’ve now found the right spot on the cross member. I have a 5 metre roof so I can raise the car with the bonnet up which is handy. Installation cost me $1400 but I was given a thorough lesson on how to safely operate the hoist so I consider it money well spent. My only regret is that I waited so long to get a hoist. Love it!!
Cheers, Ken
EK283
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Re: School me: a hoist at home

Post by EK283 »

Hi there guys,

I have a two poster Molnar and its superb for doing almost anything. The reason I prefer it is because you can't put shit on it, some will say you shouldn't but I would because I have to much stuff !
The other reason is the two poster is not as big, and you can do oil changes wheel and brake changes, exhaust work etc etc. The 4 poster you still have to jack up the axles and the ramps take up lots of room.
The only thing I dont like is the cable pulley system goes betwwen the posts on the floor so gearbox removal with a trolley is dificult. My next hoist, if i ever get one will have the overhead joiner so the floor is free.
If you are only going to store cars then yes the 4 poster would be a better option.
My hoist is 3 phase but im sure there's plenty out there that are single phase. Unfortunately like everything the chinese have control of this market now so you will have to research what is the best.

Greg
So many cars so little time!
Mick
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Re: School me: a hoist at home

Post by Mick »

i've been to your place
step 1. sell house
2. buy more car friendly house :lol:
i have 2 driveways one where the daily cars park and the other goes to the back yard where my garage is and it still shits me it's only a single wide drive down to a double shed
sometimes yor just better off shitting in yor hands and clapping

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funkyscooter
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Re: School me: a hoist at home

Post by funkyscooter »

Hey Harv,
I have no experience with a 2 poster so take this as totally biased. My 4 post would be great if I had the height to raise it enough to get another car under it. Its 240v, think it takes 20 seconds to raise, 10 to lower, so not too long. It's got the provision to bolt to the floor but I have never bothered as I always thought I would be moving it from side to side with the provided attachable wheels. That aint happening, as to do that, you would need to take the car off.
My floor is flat, over 200mm thick concrete (at least it is at the back of the shed).
If you were storing a leaky car on top, I would run a couple lengths of ply between the 2 ramps.

My is a Lift King 8 from hero hoist. Delievered on a flat bed tow truck, some (back breaking) self assembly required.
Scott
(Not so rusty) Ol' Rusty - FB/EK Sedan
BS
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School me: a hoist at home

Post by BS »

I have a 4 post tuff lift. Single phase. Bought for an extra parking spot but has actually been great to work on too. I splashed out for the jack that slides up and down the center so if I want to do brakes or suspension work it’s no big deal getting the wheels off the ground to do what you need to do. Mine also came with castors that can be attached to allow you to move it around if required which again has been pretty handy. If I’m doing something that’s going to be messy, attach the castors, wheel the hoist outside, make a mess and wheel it back inside when I’m done.

I’ve been really happy with my tufflit and would buy one again no problems.


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Harv
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Re: School me: a hoist at home

Post by Harv »

Thanks gents. Micks right, it would probably be easier to move houses but I like Greystanes (walking distance to the pub, easy drive to Eastern Creek, tolerant neighbours).

Looks like:
a) four poster,
b) maybe from Tufflift, Molnar or Lift King,
c) buy the jacking beam and drip trays,
d) 240V should be doable.

Will do some more research, select a hoist and then spec the slab/roof height of the shed to suit.

Quick question though. Some of the four post lifts have long ramps. It looks like the ramps are either removable or tilt up as the hoist raises. I don't know that I will have room for long ramps. My mental picture is that the shed will be not much longer than the existing fibro shed. Long ramps could stick out through the roller door, but would be a pain if they do not retract. How do the long ramps work in practice?

Cheers,
Harv
327 Chev EK wagon, original EK ute for Number 1 Daughter, an FB sedan meth monster project and a grey motored FED.
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funkyscooter
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Re: School me: a hoist at home

Post by funkyscooter »

My ramps hook onto the ends. They are currently leaning against the wall but were used as poor man's wheel chocks when the wheels were on it.
Scott
(Not so rusty) Ol' Rusty - FB/EK Sedan
Blacky
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Re: School me: a hoist at home

Post by Blacky »

I have a single phase hydraulic hoist and a 3 phase screw hoist - single phase is fine as long as its a hydraulic type, I converted the screw hoist to single phase when it was in my house in Kalgoorlie and it was hopeless - went from a 2.2kW 3 phase motor to a 4kW single phase and still had to gear it down to get it to lift an EK - would not have had a chance to lift a 3 tonne vehicle like its rated for .
When you're faced with an unpleasant task that you really don't want to do, sometimes you just have to dig deep down inside and somehow find the patience to wait for someone else to do it for you.


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BS
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Re: School me: a hoist at home

Post by BS »

With my tuff lift the ramps store in the center where the drip trays go. You just lift them out and clip them in when driving a car on. The jacking beam, ramps and drip tray set cover the entire center section so whatever is parked underneath is safe from any leaks


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BS
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Re: School me: a hoist at home

Post by BS »

Image


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Harv
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Re: School me: a hoist at home

Post by Harv »

I'm leaning towards the Tufflift.

The shed/carport needs to have a lifting point so that I can take engines in/out. In my current carport, I ran a heavy steel RHS beam across one end with a lifting eye. I mount a block and tackle (endless chain), roll the car under, reef the motor then roll the car out from under it.

A question for BS please - can I use the hoist as a mount for a block and tackle (say by making a simple beam from RHS that spans the upper deck like the jacking trolley does? If the jacking trolley will lift the front end of a car, a simple beam (should) be OK to lift just the engine.

I am thinking the new shed/carport needs a similar arrangement, but am a bit wary. This would be asking the shed/carport mob to design in a single roof beam designed for a 300kg point load... this may raise more than a few eyebrows.

My mental picture would be to have the hoist empty, raise it up to full height, fit the block and tackle/beam to the upper deck, roll the car under, reef the motor then roll the car out from under it. All raising/lowering done with the endless chain, not the hoist motor.

Cheers,
Harv
327 Chev EK wagon, original EK ute for Number 1 Daughter, an FB sedan meth monster project and a grey motored FED.
Blacky
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Re: School me: a hoist at home

Post by Blacky »

I doubt you would get sufficient height Harv ? In one of my sheds I had a post bolted to the floor and the roof truss against the wall then I built a Hopley truss on a swivel (out of old drill steels so it was as strong as buggery ) so when you weren't using it you could swivel it around to the wall and when you needed it you swung it out and I had a triangular leg that bolted to the outboard end to support it. Took up virtually no room
When you're faced with an unpleasant task that you really don't want to do, sometimes you just have to dig deep down inside and somehow find the patience to wait for someone else to do it for you.


Foundation member #61 of FB/EK Holden club of W.A.
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